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    • 14 Jun 2018
    • 1:00 PM
    • 11 May 2024
    • 3:00 PM
    • A Recorded Event - study anytime & anywhere!
    • 190
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    A  short three part program covering  the knowledge and skills required to effectively use sensory techniques such as body wraps.

    Learn all about the "What, "How" & Why" of Body Wraps
    Instructor - Kathy Cascade

    Three Short Lessons

    This course is divided into three short lessons consisting of a Power Point presentation in a recorded webinar format.   A 5 question self-assessment quiz will be available at the end of each lesson to enhance your learning and allow you to confirm your understanding and knowledge. 

    Lesson One will provide an overview of sensory concepts, particularly how tactile and proprioceptive input can influence the nervous system, often resulting in changes in posture, movement, and behavior.  This section will also describe the purpose of using Body Wraps for dogs, proper fit and duration of wear, and the common situations where Body Wraps may be helpful in a home or other environment.

    Lesson Two will provide a step by step process for introducing and applying three variations of TTouch Body Wraps, and how to address any concerns the dog may demonstrate.  Several pictures and video clips are included to assist you in developing your skills.

    Lesson Three will describe the use and application of Face and Head Wraps, and tips on the use of Thundershirts.  There are several pictures and video clips to assist you in developing your skills.



    As trainers we are always looking for effective and creative ways to help the dogs we work with learn appropriate behavior and live successfully in our human world.  We are also modeling to our clients how to communicate and interact with their dogs in a humane, respectful, and caring manner.   Typically, positive reward-based training techniques are very successful in shaping new behaviors.  Unfortunately, not all dogs are receptive to training in the moment due to states of anxiety, fear, or over-arousal, which interfere with optimal learning.  The goal of this course is help you learn about “sensory techniques,” which simply means the use of specific sensory input (tactile, proprioceptive) to give dogs new experiences.  These types of sensory experiences can influence both emotional and physical states, resulting in a lowering of arousal and improved focus.  We will start with a very simple, but often profound tool called the Body Wrap.

    The Body Wrap for animals originated with the Tellington TTouch Method over 30 years ago and was the inspiration for the development of the Anxiety Wrap and the Thundershirt.  As a Physical Therapist, I was also introduced to the concept of sensory techniques applied to children suffering from a variety of sensory processing disorders in the form of weighted vests and other light pressure garments. 

    When you register:

    1. You will receive a welcome document with detailed information about the program
    2. You receive immediate access to all three lessons as webinars and the PDF copies of each lessons  presentations. 
    3. You also receive links to each of the open-book online short self-check tests at the end of each module
    4. Upon completion of the program you also receive a link to the open-book online final program short test. The test can be taken more than once and requires a pass of 85%
    5. You will receive a video homework instruction document
    6. You will be required to complete and submit three short videos demonstrating your skills in applying a Half Body Wrap, a Full Body Wrap, and a Face Wrap on a dog
    7. Upon successful completion you will receive a completion certificate to proudly display as both a PDF and a graphic. 


    Learning Objectives 

    •  Understand the basic concept of using sensory input to influence posture, body awareness, and behavioral responses.
    • Identify multiple environmental contexts in which a Body Wrap or Thundershirt may be helpful.
    • Identify multiple behavioral issues in which the use of a Body Wrap or Thundershirt typically has been used.
    • Demonstrate the sequence of steps to introducing and applying a Half Body Wrap on a dog.
    • Demonstrate the sequence of steps to introducing and applying a Full Body Wrap on a dog.
    • Demonstrate the sequence of steps to introducing and applying a Face Wrap on a dog.
    • Demonstrate appropriate body positioning while applying a Body Wrap or Face Wrap to avoid leaning over a dog and remaining safe.
    • Understand and demonstrate the correct fit of a Body Wrap and Face Wrap.
    • Learn how to work through initial concerns and how to help a dog overcome a freeze response.
    • Understand the difference between containment and restraint.


    Get Started Today! You Can Start & Finish in One Sitting!

    • 16 Sep 2019
    • 2:00 PM
    • 16 Sep 2023
    • 3:00 PM
    • GoToWebinar
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    CEUs: PPAB 1, IAABC 1, KPA 1


    Registered for the live event, get busy and cannot make it?

    Don't worry, you will automatically receive a recording!


    Behavioral stereotypies in captive animals have been defined as repetitive, largely invariant patterns of behavior that serve no obvious goal or function (Mason, 1991a; Ödberg, 1978). Stereotypies are commonly attributed to boredom and/or fear and are typically “treated” by trying to enrich the captive environment with distracting, appealing stimuli. These stimuli often include food presented at times outside of regular feeding times, and as a result, engage species-typical foraging behaviors in the process of reducing stereotypic activity.

    This presentation examines the defining features and common hypotheses surrounding stereotypies, including what their function is and how they can be addressed. Of primary concern will be (1) what are stereotypies (what does and doesn’t meet the definition), (2) specific examples of how they’ve been discussed and dealt with, and (3) practical solutions for applied animal behaviorists for both defining and treating stereotypies. Emphasis will be placed on an empirical, functional approach to dealing with stereotypies, including how any scientist and/or practitioner can be most effective when dealing with this topic.

    Learning Objectives

    1. What are stereotypies in terms of their definition and examples?
    2. How do we talk about stereotypies in terms of their form and function?
    3. What evidence supports their hypothesized functions?
    4. How are most stereotypies treated, and which of these treatments are most effective?
    5. What does an empirical, functional approach to stereotypies look like, and why is this important for both science and practice?



    About The Presenter


    Eduardo J Fernandez, PhD

    School of Behavior Analysis, Florida Institute of Technology


    Dr. Eduardo J. Fernandez received his Ph.D. in Psychology (minors in Neuroscience and Animal Behavior) from Indiana University, where he worked with the Indianapolis and Cincinnati Zoo. He received his M.S. in Behavior Analysis from the University of North Texas, where he
    founded and was President of the Organization for Reinforcement Contingencies with Animals (ORCA). Most of his past and current work involves conducting research on the behavioral welfare of captive exotic animals found in zoos and aquariums. He has worked with close to 50 species of animals, with a focus on marine animals, carnivores, and primates. He is currently a Visiting Professor in the School of Behavior Analysis at Florida Institute of Technology. His past positions include an Affiliate Professorship in the Psychology Department at University of Washington, Research Fellowship with Woodland Park Zoo, and National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship. While working with UW and Woodland Park Zoo, he started the Behavioral Enrichment Animal Research (BEAR) group, which conducted welfare research with the African and Asian elephants, hippos, Humboldt penguins, grizzly bears, sun bears, sloth bears, Sumatran tigers, jaguars, African wild dogs, meerkats, golden lion tamarins, and ostriches located at the zoo. Eduardo also continues to run the Animal Reinforcement Forum (ARF), a former listserv and now Facebook group
    , which is dedicated to group discussions on animal training and behavior from a scientific perspective.

    • 10 Apr 2020
    • 1:00 PM
    • 10 Apr 2023
    • 2:00 PM
    • Recorded Webinar
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    CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT 1, IAABC 1, KPA 1


    Registered for the live event, get busy and cannot make it?

    Don't worry, you will automatically receive a recording!

    Welcome to the age of genetic testing! Suddenly panels of genetic tests for dogs are relatively affordable for the average pet owner. These tests claim to tell you what your dog’s breed ancestry is (for those of us with mystery mixes) and to give you a heads-up about possible health issues. However, although similar direct-to-consumer testing is carefully regulated for humans, there is no regulation in place for them in veterinary medicine. Additionally, while trained genetic counselors are available to help interpret these results for your human family, no such speciality exists among veterinarians, and general practice veterinarians are not typically trained in this area. How much can we trust the results of these tests? Are some tests or companies more reliable than others? Dr. Hekman is a veterinarian and a genomics researcher who studies canine genetics. She will explain how these tests work, and will build on that explanation to explain the differences between various products, and which products are helpful in which situations.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Be able to read canine ancestry results ("what breeds are in your mix?") with an understanding of which results are more or less reliable, and why.
    • Evaluate different genetic testing companies with an understanding of which products are better for your needs.
    • Understand and explain differences between health test results with traditional at risk/carrier/clear status versus those with more complex interpretation.
    • Describe the basics of how genetic testing works.

    About The Presenter


    Dr. Jessica Hekman, DVM, PhD

    Jessica is a veterinary researcher who is fascinated by dog behavior. After eleven years working as a computer programmer, she decided to go back to school to research the causes of behavior problems in dogs. She received her veterinary degree in 2012 from the Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine in Massachusetts, where she also received a Master's degree for her work on stress behaviors in hospitalized dogs. After graduation, she completed a year-long internship specializing in shelter medicine at the University of Florida Maddie's Shelter Medicine Program. She received her PhD in genetics at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, studying a group of foxes (often known as the "Siberian silver foxes") which have been bred over many generations to be friendly to humans. She is currently working at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard as a postdoctoral associate, studying the genetics of behavior in pet dogs through the Darwin's Ark project and the Working Dogs Project. Her ultimate goal is to find genetic causes of fearfulness in dogs, to work with behaviorally challenged shelter dogs, and to help people better understand the science behind dog behavior. She also frequently teaches online classes and webinars about canine genetics and behavior. Jessica lives in Raymond, NH with her husband and three dogs. You can follow her on Twitter @dogzombieblog or on Facebook at facebook.com/dogzombieblog.



    • 11 Jun 2020
    • 1:00 PM
    • 11 Jun 2024
    • 2:00 PM
    • Recorded Webinar
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    CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT 1, IAABC 1, KPA 1


    Registered for the live event, get busy and cannot make it?

    Don't worry, you will automatically receive a recording!

    So you have a shy dog - one who's easily frightened of strange people or places, or maybe even one who sits at home IMAGINING what horrible thing might happen next. Is this because of genetics? Or did you mess up somehow? In this webinar, Jessica will talk about the biology behind anxiety: the roles of genetics, early environment (as early as in mom's uterus!), and socialization.

    Spoiler alert: you didn't mess up. But this webinar will help you understand better where your dog is coming from and help you think through the many different puzzle pieces that made her who she is. Jessica will also provide concrete suggestions for breeders, puppy buyers, and working dog trainers to help minimize the chances of producing or buying anxious dogs.

    Learning Objectives:

    • List the different methods by which parents pass information on to their offspring, which might make offspring more or less anxious

    • Discuss the importance of mild stress, but not trauma, in early life

    • Explain how genetics and early life experiences can interact to result in adult anxiety

    • Describe the pre-fear period in puppies and explain its relevance to adult anxiety

    • List some negative effects of stress in terms of health and well-being

    About The Presenter


    Dr. Jessica Hekman, DVM, PhD

    Jessica is a veterinary researcher who is fascinated by dog behavior. After eleven years working as a computer programmer, she decided to go back to school to research the causes of behavior problems in dogs. She received her veterinary degree in 2012 from the Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine in Massachusetts, where she also received a Master's degree for her work on stress behaviors in hospitalized dogs. After graduation, she completed a year-long internship specializing in shelter medicine at the University of Florida Maddie's Shelter Medicine Program. She received her PhD in genetics at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, studying a group of foxes (often known as the "Siberian silver foxes") which have been bred over many generations to be friendly to humans. She is currently working at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard as a postdoctoral associate, studying the genetics of behavior in pet dogs through the Darwin's Ark project and the Working Dogs Project. Her ultimate goal is to find genetic causes of fearfulness in dogs, to work with behaviorally challenged shelter dogs, and to help people better understand the science behind dog behavior. She also frequently teaches online classes and webinars about canine genetics and behavior. Jessica lives in Raymond, NH with her husband and three dogs. You can follow her on Twitter @dogzombieblog or on Facebook at facebook.com/dogzombieblog.



    • 07 Aug 2020
    • 1:00 PM
    • 07 Aug 2023
    • 2:00 PM
    • Recorded Webinar
    Register


    CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT 1, IAABC 1, KPA 1


    Registered for the live event, get busy and cannot make it?

    Don't worry, you will automatically receive a recording!

    Veterinarians used to routinely recommend that your dog be neutered (spayed or castrated) at 6 months of age.  That recommendation has been questioned in the past decade as information about the possible health consequences of early age neuter (or neuter at any age) comes to light.

    Jessica Hekman, DVM, PhD, will discuss what we know about the relationship of spay/neuter timing and changes in the risk of development of cancer and/or of orthopedic injuries such as cranial cruciate ligament disease (CCL tear).  She will also talk about how spay/neuter can affect behavior, for better or worse.  She will specifically discuss some recent studies and will detail problems designing effective studies to ask these questions. She will also cover alternative approaches to the traditional spay/neuter surgery. If you are wondering when, or if, you should neuter your dog, make your decision based on facts, not emotions.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Interpret recent findings about spay/neuter outcomes in light of what those studies can actually tell us
    • Make reasoned decisions about the risk of cancer/orthopedic disease and early spay/neuter
    • List alternatives to traditional spay/neuter and compare their pros and cons to traditional spay/neuter
    • RELAX about this decision!

    About The Presenter


    Dr. Jessica Hekman, DVM, PhD

    Jessica is a veterinary researcher who is fascinated by dog behavior. After eleven years working as a computer programmer, she decided to go back to school to research the causes of behavior problems in dogs. She received her veterinary degree in 2012 from the Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine in Massachusetts, where she also received a Master's degree for her work on stress behaviors in hospitalized dogs. After graduation, she completed a year-long internship specializing in shelter medicine at the University of Florida Maddie's Shelter Medicine Program. She received her PhD in genetics at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, studying a group of foxes (often known as the "Siberian silver foxes") which have been bred over many generations to be friendly to humans. She is currently working at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard as a postdoctoral associate, studying the genetics of behavior in pet dogs through the Darwin's Ark project and the Working Dogs Project. Her ultimate goal is to find genetic causes of fearfulness in dogs, to work with behaviorally challenged shelter dogs, and to help people better understand the science behind dog behavior. She also frequently teaches online classes and webinars about canine genetics and behavior. Jessica lives in Raymond, NH with her husband and three dogs. You can follow her on Twitter @dogzombieblog or on Facebook at facebook.com/dogzombieblog.



    • 06 Oct 2020
    • 1:00 PM
    • 06 Oct 2024
    • 2:00 PM
    • Recorded Webinar
    Register


    CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT 1, IAABC 1, KPA 1


    Registered for the live event, get busy and cannot make it?

    Don't worry, you will automatically receive a recording!

    Anxiety is a major problem for many pet dogs. What happens in your dog's brain and body when something scares her? How long can you expect her stress response to last?

    In this webinar, Jessica Hekman, DVM, PhD, will talk about the stress response in dogs. She will explain the original evolutionary purpose of the stress response; what the hormones involved in it (like cortisol) do in the body; the difference between acute and chronic stress and the different effects they have on dogs' health; and what we know about how long it takes the body to clear those hormones. You will definitely learn some cool stuff about how the brain works and what that means for your stressed-out dog!

    Learning Objectives:

    • Describe how the stress response functions and what its purpose is.
    • Describe health effects (both positive and negative!) for acute versus chronic stress.
    • Explain how the stress response affects the dog's brain and their ability to think clearly and behave normally.
    • Describe how long it takes the stress response to clear from the body, and list possible alternative explanations for dogs who display signs of stress longer than it takes for stress hormones to be cleared.

    About The Presenter


    Dr. Jessica Hekman, DVM, PhD

    Jessica is a veterinary researcher who is fascinated by dog behavior. After eleven years working as a computer programmer, she decided to go back to school to research the causes of behavior problems in dogs. She received her veterinary degree in 2012 from the Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine in Massachusetts, where she also received a Master's degree for her work on stress behaviors in hospitalized dogs. After graduation, she completed a year-long internship specializing in shelter medicine at the University of Florida Maddie's Shelter Medicine Program. She received her PhD in genetics at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, studying a group of foxes (often known as the "Siberian silver foxes") which have been bred over many generations to be friendly to humans. She is currently working at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard as a postdoctoral associate, studying the genetics of behavior in pet dogs through the Darwin's Ark project and the Working Dogs Project. Her ultimate goal is to find genetic causes of fearfulness in dogs, to work with behaviorally challenged shelter dogs, and to help people better understand the science behind dog behavior. She also frequently teaches online classes and webinars about canine genetics and behavior. Jessica lives in Raymond, NH with her husband and three dogs. You can follow her on Twitter @dogzombieblog or on Facebook at facebook.com/dogzombieblog.



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DogNostics is the sister company to and provides the key education for DogSmith Licensed professionals. 


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